The Empire State Building

New York's famous Empire State Building, a New York City Landmark and a National Historic Landmark, soars more than a quarter of a mile into the atmosphere above the heart of Manhattan.
Located on the 86th floor, 1,050 feet (320 meters) above the city's bustling streets, the Observatory offers panoramic views from within a glass enclosed pavilion and from the surrounding open-air promenade.
Since the Observatory opened to the public in 1931, almost 110 million visitors have thrilled to the awe-inspiring vision of the city beneath them.
The Empire State Building


Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, located on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. Standing 1,047 feet (319 meters) high, it was briefly the world's tallest building before it was overtaken by the Empire State Building in 1931. After the destruction of the World Trade Center, it is again the second tallest building in New York City.
Chrysler Building

New York Times Building

The New York Times Building is a recently completed skyscraper on the west side of Midtown Manhattan, New York. Its chief tenant is The New York Times Company, publisher of the The New York Times, The Boston Globe, the International Herald Tribune, as well as other regional papers, and radio and television stations. The construction came to a completion during the second quarter of 2007, and The New York Times began moving into the building in early June.
New York Times Building

American International Building

The American International Building is a 66-story, 952 foot (290 m) tall building in Lower Manhattan in New York City. It was completed in 1932 during the New York skyscraper race, which accounts for its gothic-like spire-topped appearance, a popular architectural style at that time. It was the tallest building in Downtown Manhattan until the 1970s when the World Trade Center was completed. Upon September 11, 2001 it regained the status of the tallest downtown building. It is currently the fifth tallest in New York City, after the Empire State Building and Chrysler Building, and the fourteenth tallest in the United States.
American International Building

40 Wall Street

40 Wall Street is the address of the building that was The Bank of the Manhattan Company building when it was opened, but then became known by the numerical address when its founding tenant merged with the Chase National Bank to form the Chase Manhattan Bank. It became The Trump Building . The building is a 70-story skyscraper in the New York City borough of Manhattan, completed in 1930 after only 11 months of construction. It is located on the north side of Wall Street, between Nassau Street and William Street. Its pinnacle reaches 927 feet (282.5m) and was very briefly the tallest building in the world, soon surpassed by the Chrysler Building finished that same year. The building is now also known as the Trump Building (which adorns the building currently) after a 1996 renovation by Donald Trump who had bought the building. In 1998, the building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.
40 Wall Street

The Citigroup Center

The Citigroup Center (formerly Citicorp Center) is one of the largest skyscrapers in New York City, United States, located at 601 Lexington Avenue between 53rd Street and 54th Street in midtown Manhattan. The 59-floor, 915-foot (279 m) building is one of the most distinctive and imposing in New York's skyline, with a 45° angled top and a unique stilt-style base. It contains 1.3 million square feet (120,000 m²) of office space, and the 45-degree angle at the top of the building was originally intended to contain solar panels to provide energy (this idea was eventually dropped, however). It was designed by architect Hugh Stubbins Jr. for Citibank, and was completed in 1977.
Citigroup Center

Trump World Tower

Trump World Tower is a luxury residential skyscraper at 845 United Nations Plaza (First Avenue between 47th and 48th Streets) in Manhattan, New York City. Construction began in 1999 and concluded in 2001. Designed by Polish architect Marta Rudzka, the building is 262 meters high and has 72 constructed floors with facades of dark, bronze-tinted glass.
Trump World Tower

GE Building

The GE Building is an Art Deco skyscraper that forms the centerpiece of the Rockefeller Center in Midtown Manhattan. Known as the RCA Building until 1988, it is famous for housing the headquarters of the television network NBC. At 850 feet (259 meters) tall, the 70-story building is the 8th tallest building in New York City and the 31st tallest in the United States.
GE Building

CitySpire Center

The CitySpire Center is the tallest mixed-use skyscraper in New York City, located on West 56th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in Midtown Manhattan. Finished in 1987, it is 248 meters (814 ft) tall and has 75 floors, with a total of 359,000 square feet of area. The building is owned by Tishman Speyer Properties.
CitySpire Center

One Chase Manhattan Plaza

One Chase Manhattan Plaza is a banking skyscraper located in the downtown Manhattan Financial District of New York City. Construction on the building was completed in 1961. It has 60 floors, with 4 basement floors, and is 248 meters (813 feet) tall, making it the 10th tallest building in New York City, the 38th tallest in the United States, and the 94th tallest building in the world.
One Chase Manhattan Plaza

Condé Nast Building

The Condé Nast Building, officially Four Times Square, is a modern skyscraper in Times Square in Midtown Manhattan. Located on Broadway between 42nd Street and 43rd, the structure was finished in January 2000 as part of a larger project to redevelop 42nd Street. The building stretches 48 stories to 809 ft (247 m) making it the 11th tallest building in New York City and the 39th tallest in the United States. The size of the tower raised concerns from the city about what impact this sized tower would have on Times Square. The major office space tenants are magazine publishing company Condé Nast Publications and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, the wealthiest U.S. law firm. Major retail tenants include ESPN Zone and Duane Reade.
Condé Nast Building

MetLife Building

The MetLife Building, originally the Pan Am Building, is located at 200 Park Avenue in New York City.
MetLife Building

Woolworth Building

The Woolworth Building, at fifty-five stories, is one of the oldest and one of the most famous skyscrapers in New York City. More than ninety years after its construction, it is still one of the fifty tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the twenty tallest buildings in New York City. The building is a National Historic Landmark, having been listed in 1966.
Woolworth Building
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